Earl Wilson, AIA

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"A building needs to convey a message; say something interesting. It needs to evoke a feeling."

Designing evocative buildings that generate an emotional response is Earl's goal as an architect. Having the building tell a story is a means of creating distinct environments. "Everything starts with the idea," Earl said. "The idea is the story or the image. It is how you evoke a sense of place and develop a unique response to the conditions each project has to offer."


Each design is developed through critical assessment of the project itself; finding singular features that can be incorporated into the design as they relate to the site, function and the individual user or owner. These concepts are demonstrated in Earl's design of the Library of Congress' Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation in Virginia and the Film and Television Archives in Southern California.


Each project has a unique and appropriate response to its site. In both cases the sites are strong and beautiful; one in rural Virginia and the other in the hills outside Los Angeles. "The buildings are integrated into the landscape and relate distinctively to their place," Earl said.


Earl's connection with BAR Architects harkens back to his alma mater, the University of Oregon, where fellow alumni and founders of BAR – Bob Arrigoni, Bruce Ross and Howard Backen – all delivered lectures on architecture while Earl was a student. Impressed by their work, Earl joined the firm in 1987 and was named a principal in 2007.

"A building needs to convey a message; say something interesting. It needs to evoke a feeling."